I'm such a di'kut...

the-queen-of-puns:

When you dig up the wrong corpse, you know you’ve made a grave mistake—

blackpepper0810:

2014/10/17 Clone Commander Neyo

kangeera:

Art switcharound done with funk-yeah & sixxybaby! Ft. everyone’s favourite clone, Fives.

All the feels.

While at it, why not have a look at ascottlegacy ‘s art of Fives?

[Full view]

isildur-elessar:

Lightsabers

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - EYES!Eyes are what convey most of someone’s expression. Body language is important, but “eyes don’t lie”. There’s a reason why someone who’s lying will generally try to avoid eye contact. We are biologically set-up to “read” someone’s inner feelings by looking at their eyes.In storyboarding, if I’m in a real hurry to make a sequence “read” better, I will try to hit the eyes and facial expression as best as I can before anything else, especially if it’s an emotional scene.Have a great Tuesday, everyone!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - EYES!

Eyes are what convey most of someone’s expression. Body language is important, but “eyes don’t lie”. There’s a reason why someone who’s lying will generally try to avoid eye contact. We are biologically set-up to “read” someone’s inner feelings by looking at their eyes.

In storyboarding, if I’m in a real hurry to make a sequence “read” better, I will try to hit the eyes and facial expression as best as I can before anything else, especially if it’s an emotional scene.

Have a great Tuesday, everyone!

Norm

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

albinwonderland:

mahouprince:

tokyo-fashion:

What Harajuku Girls Look Like These Days
New video about modern Japanese decora
fashion by Refinery29! We helped to connect the producers with the Harajuku kids for this video. I’m very happy that they treat the subculture - and the people in it - with respect. We never know how things will turn out when we connect foreign media to Harajuku subcultures, but this one is well done. Please check out the video!

This honestly was such a good watch! It is always a bit scary sometimes when people do informational pieces on fashions like decora because you worry how they are going to perceive it but I can honestly say this was a good piece. It was so nice to see how the japanese decora cuties feel about their fashion and it was also cool that they compared it to how decora originally looked when it began. I guess Im just so glad that decora is a fashion thats still alive and kicking (even if its just in small groups) because its a fashion that makes me so extraordinarily happy. 

A great watch! Brought me back to the FRUiTS livejournal days <3

albinwonderland:

mahouprince:

tokyo-fashion:

What Harajuku Girls Look Like These Days

New video about modern Japanese decora
fashion by Refinery29! We helped to connect the producers with the Harajuku kids for this video. I’m very happy that they treat the subculture - and the people in it - with respect. We never know how things will turn out when we connect foreign media to Harajuku subcultures, but this one is well done. Please check out the video!

This honestly was such a good watch! It is always a bit scary sometimes when people do informational pieces on fashions like decora because you worry how they are going to perceive it but I can honestly say this was a good piece. It was so nice to see how the japanese decora cuties feel about their fashion and it was also cool that they compared it to how decora originally looked when it began. I guess Im just so glad that decora is a fashion thats still alive and kicking (even if its just in small groups) because its a fashion that makes me so extraordinarily happy. 

A great watch! Brought me back to the FRUiTS livejournal days <3

kablob17:

Sheev is so completely sure of his victory that he calls Luke his apprentice practically as soon as he walks in the door.

Of course he’s going to win. He’s won every single thing in the last 25 years. No one can resist him.

Luke was completely right. His overconfidence is his weakness.

But his real problem is that he thinks that he’s trying to turn Anakin Skywalker 2.0 to the dark side.

When what he’s really dealing with is Padme Amidala’s son.

skygawker:

anakin skywalker? i love that character. the way he just [clenches fist] walks on all those frickin’ skies. 

naamahdarling:

claidilady:

sunteaflower:

We call ships ‘she.’ We call our war machines ‘women.’ We compare women to black widows and vipers. And you’re going to tell me it’s not ‘lady-like’ to scream, to take up space, to fight and demand respect and do whatever the hell I want. You’ve looked at nuclear bombs and been so in awe that you could only name them after women. Don’t try to down-play my power.

i understand the need to reclaim power and strength for women but i feel like this rubs me the wrong way because it’s just so de-contextualized as a statement? 

first: we call machines “she” because they can be controlled and operated. we call them she because men see objects as things just like they see women as things. on a meta level, it’s easy to say that the need to call weapons of war she has to do with 1.) massive homophobia in modern industrialized warfare and militaries (and even every day society, like men calling their cars ‘girls’) and 2.) the idea that war is meant to de-masculinize and devastate the opponent. It is a humiliation that is understood on a subconscious level.  

second: i don’t know what nuclear bombs you’re talking about, but the only nuclear bombs dropped onto people were called “fat boy” and “little man”. it doesn’t take a huge stretch to point out the phallic shape associated with nuclear warfare.

third: women are called vipers and black widows because uh…they’re constantly coded as malicious, treacherous, sexual, and murderous beings who pose a threat to men? last time I checked, the “black widow” who preys upon rich men, marries them, and then murders them for their money was not a flattering or empowering term. 

this is why i was so upset that when discussions of weapons & women/the feminine came about it seemed to call this all positive and empowering instead of fundamentally identifying the societal coding of women and their sexuality as dangerous and evil (particularly in the west), and to identity how women in the media are coded as objects and tools of sexual/destructive force either to society, or men or masculinity in general. (see also: fragility of masculinity, the harlot, the madonna/whore complex, the black widow, the gold digger, the slut, the siren, the succubus, vagina dentata, bridezilla, dragon lady, welfare queen, the hairy lesbian, etc tropes/slurs/stereotypes ALL of which directly related to sexuality or lack thereof or coded “mis-used” sexuality.) 

last: i do not want to be an atom bomb. i am not an imprint or an echo of the destructive forces of the patriarchy and have no desire to be associated with black widows or vipers or war machines. my interest in destruction of societal norms which harm people cannot be equated to an industrial military complex, neither can my sexuality or my being. 

it is not the same kind of power, it is not the same kind of force. 

we can be powerful without wearing the masks of men. 

I agree with everything in both these posts.  Yes, that’s possible.

I’m happy to be a war machine.  I’m happy to be a viper.  I’m happy to be a mighty gunship, or a nuclear bomb.  Because I’m still me, and I get to decide what those things mean.  I don’t care who made me, or who shaped me, I belong to myself now.

There’s a reason that shit like Skynet is scary, a reason robot rebellion/AIs becoming sentient and then wreaking havoc is a perennial theme.  Because people are afraid of the moment when that which was created to be subservient becomes self-willed and self-aware.  And they should be.

No, women weren’t created to be subservient.  But the patriarchy thinks that.  And the subtext of the original post reads, to me, as someone saying “I don’t care if you mean it as an insult either forehanded or backhanded. You liken me to a thing of power, or things of power to me, because you fear me on some level. That gives me power. Whether you meant it to or not. You can’t take that back. I may be a war machine, but I’m MY war machine.”

I’m a huge fan of the monstrous/destructive feminine for a reason. Those things have been used to deny women their humanity for centuries and there are a lot of people like me who are still seen as monsters.  People like me who are mentally ill, who don’t fit preconceived notions of gender, who have a body other people sometimes deem loathsome.  People like me who were raised by monsters, hardened by monsters, beaten by a monstrous society, until they became monsters … their own monsters.

Gaze too long into the abyss, yes, you become a monster.  You don’t become part of the abyss unless you jump.

There’s nothing wrong with being a monster.  There is nothing wrong with being a thing scarred and shaped by the forces that tried to destroy you.  You still belong to you.  You can still be the weapon that wields itself.  You can still be a good person.  You can still work against the forces that shaped you with pain and oppression.

You can choose to say “I am not a monster, I will not be what they made me.”  That’s incredibly noble.  I respect the shit out of that, because that is a hard road.  I salute all y’all who have made that choice.

But there’s another choice, the choice to take what they made you and be that in a way that defies them at every turn.  And that is every bit as laudable, as honorable, as brave.  That road is also hard.  Y’all who bear the wounds openly and with no shame, who embrace yourselves as things that can be horrifying and dangerous, but who can also choose to be tender and protective, y’all are my sisters, my brothers.  I love you all.

Some of us grow wings and new, shinier skins, rise up and fly away, and dedicate ourselves to being different, as different from the forces that harmed us as we can possibly be.

Some of us take the fur and fangs and claws we were forced to grow, we take the toxic waste of our blood, the jet fuel of our anger, the nuclear fission powering our hearts, and the giant robot Jaegers of our love for one another, and we use them to protect, defend, and when necessary, yes, we will use them to fight.

I’m not ashamed of what abuse and hardship and bigotry made me.  I will never be ashamed of that.  I might never feel the need to rise above that.  Because it did a lot of things to me, but one thing it didn’t do: make me into an ugly person.

I am fully human.  That is not up for debate.  But those who do not see me as human? I’m not here to change their minds by proving them wrong.  I’m here to love my monstrous sisters and brothers into being strong again.

Whatever beauty is in me is mine.  I created it.  I will always be proud of that.  I will always be beautiful. 

And because I am what monsters made me, yes, I will always be a monster, too.

I will always be a beautiful monster.

I will not rise above what I am not ashamed to be.

stefansanjati:

Turned albinwonderland into Morticia Addams today! Such fun! 
Stay tuned to her youtube channel for a make-up tutorial in the near future, and check out my youtube channel for other looks! 
Make-up by stefansanjati 

stefansanjati:

Turned albinwonderland into Morticia Addams today! Such fun! 

Stay tuned to her youtube channel for a make-up tutorial in the near future, and check out my youtube channel for other looks! 

Make-up by stefansanjati 


This is our battle cryI’m giving you a head startYou’re going to need it'Cause I fight like a girl

This is our battle cry
I’m giving you a head start
You’re going to need it
'Cause I fight like a girl

You can be in a relationship for two years and feel nothing; you can be in a relationship for 2 months and feel everything. Time is not a measure of quality; of infatuation, or of love.
What my relationships have taught me.  (via seabelle)

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology.

Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well:  Capitalism and Monarchy, respectively.